Holy Saturday: A Day on Which to Reflect


But he was pierced for our transgressions; 
he was crushed for our iniquities; 
upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace, 
and with his wounds we are healed. 
All we like sheep have gone astray; 
we have turned—every one—to his own way; 
and the LORD has laid on him 
the iniquity of us all.
(Isaiah 53:5–6, ESV)

As we have commemorated Jesus’ Passion this week, on Thursday we remembered a day on which Jesus faced betrayal, denial, abuse, humiliation, and trial. Friday we remembered His pain, suffering, and His death on a cross. And now we come to Saturday, a day in which Jesus lay in the tomb. To the disciples who followed Jesus, it was a day of confusion, disillusionment, mourning, and even fear. For Mary, the mother of Jesus, it was a day to grieve the loss of her son. For some Roman soldiers, it was a day to stand guard over the tomb. But for us, living on this side of Jesus’ death and resurrection, it is a day on which we can reflect. We can and should reflect on what the events of the Passion of Jesus truly mean to us.

Because of sin, we were separated from God. The relationship that man once had with God was destroyed. But God, although He is righteous and just and cannot tolerate sin, still desired for us to have that close relationship with Him that existed before sin entered the world. There was nothing that we, in our own human power could do to restore that relationship. And so, God decided that He would do something about it.

Some 700 years before the birth of Jesus, the prophet Isaiah spoke of the suffering servant who was to come, a person who would come from God, a person who would take upon Himself the punishment for our transgressions. His suffering, His pain, would bring us peace, it would heal our wounds. And, despite the fact that we, just like a flock of sheep, have been led astray by sin, God would lay upon this suffering servant, the imiquity of us all (Isaiah 53:5-6). Jesus was the fulfillment of this prophecy. His suffering and His death was the price that was paid to set us free from the bondage of our sin.

Jesus came into the world for the purpose of dying for us. He is the proof of a God who loves us so much that He was willing to sacrifice His one and only Son so that the relationship broken in the Garden of Eden could be restored, so that the veil of sin that separated us from God could be torn apart (John 3:16). God sent Jesus not to condemn us, but rather to save us. All that we need to do is turn from our sin and believe in the One whom God sent, Jesus (John 3:17-18). Jesus died for all of us (Romans 6:10). Not just for a few, but for as many as are willing to believe. And the best part is that, if you were the only person in the world, He would still have died for you.

Reflect today not just on how much Jesus suffered, not just the horrific and painful death that He endured, but also on the fact that He did so willingly for you. As He hung on the cross, Jesus saw each and every one of us and He endured that death with joy (Hebrews 12:2).

Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version®, copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

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